Supply chain professionals disagree about value of increased data collection

supplychaindive | September 28, 2017

Supply chain professionals disagree about value of increased data collection
Several sessions at the annual Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Edge offered conflicting views on data collection and usage: some speakers and companies think supply chain professionals need more data, while others say they have enough and just need new tools for processing it. In IBM's presentation on Watson and blockchain, the company said supply chains don't have enough data and that they need more. But according to a presentation from JDA Software, everyone has plenty of data; what's needed is the right tech for handling and understanding what it means.

Spotlight

The application of policies, procedures, and technology to protect supply chain assets (product, facilities, equipment, information, and personnel) from theft, damage, or terrorism, and to prevent, the introduction of unauthorized contraband, people, malware or weapons of mass destruction into the supply chain.

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