Futuristic Transportation We’ll See In Our Lifetime

| July 30, 2019

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The world is continuing to evolve around us. As recently as a couple of decades ago, concepts like having the internet in every home and the 3D printers would have been confined to the realms of science fiction alone. Things have changed rapidly in that time. Perhaps most interesting of all are the improvements being made in the transportation industry. Driverless cars are already on the brink of becoming a reality, but what’s next for the sector.

Spotlight

Textainer

Textainer has operated since 1979 and is the world's largest lessor of intermodal containers based on fleet size with a total of 2.0 million containers representing 3.0 million TEU in our owned and managed fleet. We lease containers to more than 400 shipping lines and other lessees. Our fleet consists of standard dry freight, dry freight specials, and refrigerated intermodal containers. We are one of the largest purchasers of new and used containers with annual capital expenditure often exceeding $1 billion. We believe we are also the largest seller of used containers, selling up to 100,000 containers per year to more than 1,100 customers. We provide our services via a network of 13 offices and 400 depots worldwide.

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Importance of Supply Chain Resilience in the Modern World

Article | July 29, 2021

Risk management has been a problem for as long as supply chains have existed. Because of the interdependence of all its connections, even a minor issue in one isolated region has the potential to jeopardize a whole global supply chain. As a result, when major global trends and events occur, the potential for widespread supply chain disruption is enormous. Global supply chain risks and market disruptions have reached an all-time high. The most notable of them is the COVID-19 pandemic. In a 2020 survey, the Institute for Supply Management discovered that 95% of companies faced operational issues due to the pandemic. As a result, business executives all around the globe believe that if they want to be more resilient and competitive in the present market, they need to modernize and make significant changes to their supply chain strategy. Other recent factors that have had a significant impact on traditional supply chain practices include the fast pace of change in consumer behaviors and a pretty unstable trade and political environment. In the last ten years, e-commerce spending has tripled, and internet shopping had increased by 149% in 2020 compared to the previous year. With the growth of e-commerce, there has been a rise in customer demand for faster delivery and more personalized shopping experiences. The Amazon Effect refers to the growing expectation for same-day delivery and its effect on businesses and logistical networks. To be resilient enough to react to these rising demands, supply chain managers have had to make fast and significant modifications to their logistics and warehousing networks, as well as discover new ways to collaborate with third-party fulfillment partners. Even before the impact of COVID-19, American businesses were attempting to reduce their dependence on foreign manufacturers and suppliers. Foreign tariffs and trade policies had become more unpredictable by 2019, and businesses were seeking technological solutions to make the supply chains more self-sufficient and resilient. As a result, integrating digital transformation and Industry 4.0 technology into supply chain operations is quickly becoming a top concern for global business leaders. How does Supply Chain Resilience Work? A flexible contingency plan and the ability to react swiftly to operational disruptions are important characteristics of effective supply chain management. However, to be truly resilient, a supply chain must be able to predict and anticipate disruptions and, in many cases, avoid them entirely. Strategic supply chain planning is an important step in achieving resilience because it synchronizes all supply chain components and increases visibility and agility. Supply and demand needs are better understood, and production is synchronized due to supply chain planning. This integrated, forward-thinking approach assists businesses in better anticipating problems, reducing the impact of supply chain disruptions, and improving overall operations. When a business has the digital systems to analyze and make sense of Big Data, it significantly improves supply chain resilience. Artificial intelligence-enabled systems can curate disparate data sets from across the business and the globe. To discover trends and opportunities, news, competitor activity, sales reports, and even customer feedback can be examined together. The system's connected devices are constantly monitored, providing real-time insights about where and how processes can be automated and improved. For instance, AI, machine learning, and modern databases acquire and handle Big Data and analyze and learn from it in an almost infinite number of ways. This enables intelligent automation across the network and provides supply chain managers with the real-time insights they require to respond quickly to disruption and unexpected events. Supply chain managers have traditionally sought to limit the number of partners and suppliers in their network to minimize operational and logistical complexity. This approach is based on the stability of the social, environmental, and political systems. Unexpected disruptions in one region can slow or even stop network operations across the board. Supply chain resilience technologies, such as blockchain, sensors, and advanced analytics, enable supply chain managers to monitor complex partnerships and supplier contracts even in the most remote parts of their network. Profitability in the supply chain has always been dependent on minimizing excess and keeping inventories as lean as possible. Capacity and inventory buffers are expensive, and supply chain managers have often bet against disruptions to keep prices low. When the pandemic struck, many businesses discovered the real cost of the gamble. Supply chain operations can involve on-demand manufacturing, virtual inventories, and predictive demand forecasting using digital supply chain technologies to remain resilient, even in times of unexpected disruption. Benefits of a Resilient Supply Chain Finding a successful balance between supply and demand is a significant issue for any supply chain manager in an increasingly competitive market. Many businesses that have cut costs on diversification, supply chain technology, and other resilience measures have lately discovered the true cost of those choices. However, when businesses engage in diversification, supply chain technologies, and other resilience measures, they can achieve a variety of business benefits, including: More efficient operations: Better resilience often results in less risk and a greater capacity to invest in innovation and growth. For example, according to a 2020 global business analysis conducted by Bain and Company, businesses that prioritized their investment in supply chain resilience had up to 60% quicker product development cycles and were able to increase production capacity by up to 25%. Enhanced productivity: Resilient supply chain solutions lead to the overall system increased productivity. According to a McKinsey 2020 survey, supply chain leaders from across the world report increased productivity due to resilient supply chain systems, and 93% of those surveyed plan to prioritize resilient supply chain strategies for investment in the next year. Risk reduction: Supply chain activities are often the most vulnerable to risk and loss in many businesses. Supply chains, by nature, are geographically distributed and functionally complex. As a result, supply chains are particularly vulnerable to risk. Resilient supply chain technologies minimize risk by providing insight into all network operations and enabling companies to improve and adjust their processes and logistics in real-time. Technologies for an Agile Supply Chain Digital transformation and modern supply chain technology provide businesses with the resilience and competitive advantage they need to react swiftly to disruptions and opportunities. Artificial intelligence (AI): AI-powered supply chain systems can offer deep procedural and operational insights by gathering and analyzing data from many sources. Predictive analytics and Big Data analysis can assist in predicting risk and demand and recommending measures and reactions in the company. Machine learning: Machine learning enables the discovery of patterns in supply chain data and the identification of these influential factors - all while constantly learning. This enables supply chain managers to react fast with the finest workflows and operational strategies available. Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT): The IIoT network in a supply chain comprises connected devices and objects with sensors and unique IDs that allow them to transmit and receive digital data. They collect information and communicate with the central system. AI can analyze and understand this data to enable quick decisions and intelligent automation of supply chain operations and procedures. Additive (3D) printing: Smart factories can quickly reprogram 3D printers to produce specific products on-demand without disrupting regular business operations in the long run. The accessibility of potential virtual inventories enables supply chains to defend themselves against disruption. Robots and autonomous things: Robots and drones, which are intelligently automated for speed, efficiency, and accuracy, can adapt their operations on the go to meet quickly changing requirements. They also reduce the risk of harm by eliminating overly repetitive or dangerous tasks from human workers. Modern databases: The resilient supply chain solutions rely on Big Data, advanced analytics, and real-time insights from modern databases. Supply chain technology can be improved to operate faster and most resilient when equipped with a modern ERP system and an in-memory database. Resilience means more than just surviving a disruption in operations. A fully resilient supply chain and businesses survive hardship and use it to innovate and improve their business. Building a resilient supply chain is very important in this modern era because disruptions like a pandemic, wars, climate change, etc., are occurring a lot these days. A resilient supply chain helps businesses to survive and thrive even during tough times. To read more about ways to boost supply chain performance, click here. FAQ What is supply chain resilience? Supply chain resilience refers to the supply chain's capacity to be prepared for unexpected risk events, react and recover swiftly to potential disruptions, and grow by shifting to a new, more desirable state in order to improve customer service, market share, and financial performance. How is supply chain resilience measured? A supply chain's resilience index is calculated by aggregating its company's resilience index. Given that supply chain company's performance influences overall supply chain performance, supply chain resilience should be measured using the companies' resilience index. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is supply chain resilience?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Supply chain resilience refers to the supply chain's capacity to be prepared for unexpected risk events, react and recover swiftly to potential disruptions, and grow by shifting to a new, more desirable state in order to improve customer service, market share, and financial performance." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How is supply chain resilience measured?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "A supply chain's resilience index is calculated by aggregating its company's resilience index. Given that supply chain company's performance influences overall supply chain performance, supply chain resilience should be measured using the companies' resilience index." } }] }

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How AI and automation are reshaping supply chain roles

Article | March 16, 2020

New technologies and AI have the potential to boost collaboration between machines and workers even if some fear the impact it could have on the jobs market. While AI has been heralded in some quarters as the innovation that will bring about a Fourth Industrial Revolution, its impact on future supply chains is still unclear. The two most prominent opinions are that either AI and automation will lead to workplace functions being replaced, or job roles will be bolstered by the technology. The first of these positions assumes that recent advances mean the skills of computers and robots will soon surpass those of workers in numerous tasks.

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5 Ways How Advanced Technology Is Disrupting Transport And Logistics Business Models

Article | March 31, 2020

The transport and logistics industry has a lot of suppliers who have had to change the model of their business in the last few years. Many of them have had to adapt and deploy innovative technologies, so, that shipping cab becomes more sustainable flexible and efficient as the growth of the industry continues. This has resulted in the disruption of the traditional business model that transportation and logistics companies are known for. As a matter of fact, in the coming decades, some of these business models will be fully upended, an example of this is the freight brokerage.

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4 Innovative Solutions for More Productive Warehouse Management

Article | February 11, 2020

Over the past 30 years, technology has transformed warehouse operations, making them more efficient as well as reducing the number of required workers. And, given that technology advances at an exponential rate, warehouse managers may find it difficult to imagine what the warehouses of the future will look like. One can be sure that Industry 4.0 will have a big part to play: IoT and 5G technology will not only increase connectivity within a warehouse, but they will also facilitate decision making and improve tracking of inventory.

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Spotlight

Textainer

Textainer has operated since 1979 and is the world's largest lessor of intermodal containers based on fleet size with a total of 2.0 million containers representing 3.0 million TEU in our owned and managed fleet. We lease containers to more than 400 shipping lines and other lessees. Our fleet consists of standard dry freight, dry freight specials, and refrigerated intermodal containers. We are one of the largest purchasers of new and used containers with annual capital expenditure often exceeding $1 billion. We believe we are also the largest seller of used containers, selling up to 100,000 containers per year to more than 1,100 customers. We provide our services via a network of 13 offices and 400 depots worldwide.

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